Managers Should Stay Away From These 5 Traits

As a manager, it’s essential to forge a leadership style that is personal and adjustable for your given workplace and team members. AudienceBloom CEO Jayson DeMers discusses 5 styles that rarely ever work, via Entrepreneur.
1. Reactive
It’s always wise to think in advance and prepare for anything (proactive), rather than just waiting to see what can happen (reactive). What sounds better: telling your client beforehand that you expect a shipment to be delayed, or apologizing afterwards for the delay and mitigating the problem? Definitely the first option.
2. Unreasonably Optimistic
Being optimistic is generally beneficial for employee performance and productivity. However, it is crucial to “control your optimism.” Optimists may be inclined to agree with a decision that shows signs of failure, or trust people that are typically unreliable. Managers should balance their optimism with a pragmatic attitude to ensure both high morale and success in their companies.
3. Controlling
While a manager should always have control of their office, don’t make a habit of micromanaging. Trying to oversee every little thing, consequently, can push your employees away. You hired your team because you know you can trust them, so allow them the space to do their job.
4. Distant
While giving your team the space and freedom to work is integral to good management, you can’t be too distant from your employees. What if your team members need your expertise or assistance on a project or an idea? What if someone has a pressing concern? You have to be available to field questions and to set your team in the right direction. Regular interaction and communication are key.
5. Narcissistic 
A selfish, individualistic person will never prosper as a manager. A great leader will be sure to acknowledge the efforts of their team, and give credit when it’s due. A successful manager knows that every success is a team’s success, not just the manager’s. In turn, employees will be much happier and more productive in their workplace.
As you continue to grow and mold your own leadership model, be mindful of falling into any of these 5 bad styles. You can read DeMers’ full article here.

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